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Flickr is deleting free users' photos in storage cull
Samsung Galaxy S9 Apps 2 min read 3 comments

Flickr is deleting free users' photos in storage cull

Flickr is changing its business model, especially for users with a free account at the popular image service. Previously you had 1 TB of free online storage available, now there is only room for 1,000 photos. Anything beyond that will be deleted by Flickr immediately. So there's a hurry.

In principle, Flickr users have two options. One is to switch to the paid account for $49.99 per year. The other option is to download the photos before they get deleted from Flickr.

How to download photos from Flickr

On the one hand, this can be done via Flickr's gallery. There you can download each of your pictures individually or mark several of them, and then save them with one click into a zip file. But if you have a lot of photos on Flickr and have organized them into albums, you should proceed differently. In the album view, you can select whole folders with one click and then download them in the same way, as a zip file.

Inside IBM Cloud Dallas
Your photos are in good hands on cloud storage. / © IBM

In both cases: you must act quickly because Flickr is beginning with the deletion of the pictures immediately, which exceed the exemption limit of 1,000 photos for free accounts. So if you don't want Flickr to delete the surplus images from your account, you should act immediately.

Alternatives to Flickr

After downloading your pictures, it seems most logical the upload them to another service. Google Photos is especially suitable for Android users. There you can store as many photos as you like, as long as you can do without the original size and want to accept a compression that is hardly noticeable in practice. Other cloud alternatives where your photos are in good hands would be OneDrive from Microsoft, Dropbox or Box.com. EyeEm can also be an exciting option, especially if you want to earn money with your pictures. At EyeEm you can also offer selected pictures for sale, and that can - provided you have the right motifs - make the cash register ring.

Have you saved your photos on Flickr? Then you'd better see if they're all still there!

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  • Like many people with a Yahoo account that utilized Flickr? I saw the writing on the wall when Yahoo was sold to Verizon! I'm almost done porting everything over to my Gmail account (buhbye Yahoo email), and I'm almost done transferring everything from Flickr to Tumblr!
    Nothing's for free anymore like it used to be! 🤷‍♂️


  • We have a semi-dormant Flickr account for sharing a few family snaps, won't be affected. It's been Flickr display features rather than storage that made it useful to me. Mega has 50GB of encrypted storage for free, and actually shows thumbnails of DNG files (other free services don't). Mega's download speeds are adequate but not quite up to OneDrive, GDrive, etc. and the developer of the good AutoSync apps hasn't built an offline folder sync client for Mega as he has for others.


  • storm 4 months ago Link to comment

    The free model has been a struggle certainly. But the paid subscription model hasn't shown it to offer the value they charge. There is still a lot of shaking to come in the internet business world. The successful models so far seem to be in creating echo chambers which I have no interest in.

    I pay two subscriptions on line. Evernote, on a tier no longer offered but grandfathered in. If they cancel my tier, Id not pay the other rates they charge and would go free tier. I do want to support businesses supplying value. Just most of them don't supply value.

    My news feed taught me that I value either the NYT or the WaPo. They produce enough analysis I find valuable to pay for ONE of them. Currently, the WaPo is getting my money. But I do monitor which one I'm using or being blocked from using to continually gauge that value. News alone isn't enough to get subscription money. I need meta content to help me pick out the most important bits from the news firehose stream with time efficiency and keep the info bubble at bay.