How Does the Data Saver work?

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Apr 29, 2019, 4:56:51 PM via Website

Can someone please explain to me how the Data Saver user interface works? I gather that this function keeps applications from sucking up data over the phone network when it's not necessary.

Do the switches "off" mean that an app will get data via WiFi only? How does this relate to the "Data Saver" on/off switch? Are they (even the ones switched off) only protected from sucking data when Data Saver is on? And if

an app's Data switch is off
I'm off WiFi and have data turned on
Have Data Saver turned on

If I want to use an app that needs data (E-mail, for example) when I'm off WiFi, will I have to find my way back to the switches and turn an app's "Unrestricted Data" switch back on before it will work? Or does opening the app allow it to get data via the phone network?

It's not clear to me what's on and off and when.

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Apr 29, 2019, 7:30:37 PM via Website

Mobile data use is costly and even more so where data plan costs are not affordable by all. Android users need the ability to reduce data use or block it from apps altogether. The Data Saver feature in the Android 7.0 release provides this functionality to the user.

The Data Saver feature can be turned on or off by the user. App developers should use a new API to check if Data Saver mode is on. If it is on, the app developers can handle the situation gracefully by tuning their applications for low- or no-data access.

End users benefit as they will be able to control which apps can access data in the background and which can access data only while in the foreground. This ensures desired background data exchange when Data Saver is on per user control.

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Apr 29, 2019, 9:44:47 PM via Website

I read that article before I asked my question. It explains why the feature exists, but it isn't clear as to how to use it. I just want to know what I'm turning on and off, and exactly how to do it and the extent to which it works. I thought I made that clear in my question. Am I trying to make this too complicated?

Let me try another example. I'm away from WiFi and I want to want to check to see if an expected e-mail has arrived. I turn on network data and open the e-mail app. Ideally, I want that app, and only that app, to access the network data. I don't want Google Maps to take this opportunity to update my off-line maps, or Amazon to tell me what I should buy next.

If nearly all the switches in Data Saver are off, does that mean that those "off" apps won't access data any time? Or does it mean that they might access data unless I turn Data Saver on? Also, If I DON'T have Data Saver turned on, will those apps whose switches are on in the Data Saver app list grab data if they get a chance?

Is there any disadvantage to leaving Data Saver turned on all the time? Will that block me from doing something I want to use data for? Do I have to remember to turn Data Saver off whenever I'm not WiFi-connected and I want to use an app that needs data access?

— modified on Apr 29, 2019, 9:52:57 PM

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Apr 30, 2019, 5:37:02 PM via Website

Thank you for sharing such detailed specific info. God Bless.

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May 7, 2019, 9:34:50 AM via Website

You have shared a good information. Thanks

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